Cornell University



An unlikely delicacy: the basket stinkhorn

This isn’t the first post you’ve seen here about stinkhorns. They’ve just got that special something. In the Western hemisphere, they’re wonderfully disgusting. In the East, they’re wonderfully delicious. Let’s explore.

cheeky cheeky stinkhorn

A fungus walks into a singles bar

Dear Professor Hodge, please explain sexual compatibility in fungi. OK, here goes. I enlisted the help of a coauthor, and together we found this surprisingly difficult to write. Fungi are wondrously strange, and sometimes barely fathomable. And what could be more mysterious than sex? We’ve included a doozy of a video to improve your reading experience.

jar full o stink

Phallus ravenelii: the common stinkhorn, Ravenel’s stinkhorn

Stink stink stink, we love stinkhorns. A little about their sordid history and biology here. What’s not to like?

wait for it

Time lapse stink

Two stinkhorn species in time lapse video. They’re astonishingly rude.

Something's coming

The shape of things to come

Welcome to the Cornell Mushroom Blog. This is our first post.


Most people don't pay much attention to fungi, which include things like mushrooms, molds, yeasts, and mildews. Here at Cornell we think they're pretty fascinating. In fact, even the most disgusting foot diseases and moldy strawberries are dear to our hearts. We'd like to talk to you about fungi, so that like us, you too can tell gross stories at the dinner table. Afterwards, maybe you'll notice some things you would have overlooked before, and we think this could be good for the planet.

Kathie T. Hodge, Editor

Beneath Notice, our book of borescopic mycology.


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