Cornell University

Links

silhouette of the mycologistHere are a few of the websites and blogs that we like best. Some are geeky. Well, I guess they’re all kind of geeky. Let’s just say some are geekier than others. We like geeky.

If you’d like more of Kathie‘s photos, visit her flickr photostream (leave me some comments!). If you’d like more of Kent‘s photos and objects and time lapses (he is a professional photographer!), visit Kent’s lab website.


MushroomExpert.com
Got a mushroom to identify? Check the keys here, especially if you’re in NE USA.

American Mushrooms
Dave Fischer’s nice site, especially for northeasterners.

MykoWeb
Michael Wood’s amazing site, especially awesome for Californians.

Tom Volk’s Fungi
Check out Tom’s Fungus of the Month Pages, and more!

MushroomObserver
A place where you–yes you–can contribute data and photos documenting fungal distribution and taxonomy.

MycoBank
Super Duper geeky database of all known fungi, their names, and classification, and stuff.

CABI resources (Species Fungorum)
We love the uber-geeky Index Fungorum, the Dictionary Hierarchy, and the Bibliography.

US National Fungus Collections databases
More geekiness! Host-fungus indices, herbarium specimens, synoptic keys to small things.


Doubtless, you’ve come to the bottom of this list and are mildly surprised or downright outraged that your fine site isn’t here. I’m so sorry. This is meant to be a short list.


Blogroll

There aren’t many other fungal blogs: The Mycokey Mycelium blog is a nice one. Jason Stajich’s blog The Hyphal Tip follows breakthroughs in fungal genomics (and stuff). A very good bet for more stories, if you dare to stray from eukaryotes, is Elio Schaechter and Merry Youle’s Small Things Considered at the American Society for Microbiology. And my writer/biologist friend Jennifer Frazer brings us a great diversity of life blog, The Artful Amoeba, which you ought to peruse. The following list is what I can find in the way of blogs devoted to fungi:

The Hyphal Tip
Nova Scotia Mycological Society
CAPE COD MUSHROOM
Moldinspector’s Weblog
Sand Shrooms
The Fungi Forager – Food & Art
Hibbett lab news
Sustainable Mycology
Shroomworks
Aphyllophorales News
MycoRant
Radical Mycology
Darv’s Fungal Photo Blog
Gary Lincoff
On The Farm
bionet.Mycology newsgroup
Lawrence Millman
Name That Mushroom!
Mycologista
FUNGILEÓN
Australian Fungi – A Blog
Cornell Mushroom Blog
Central Pennsylvania Wild Mushroom Club blogs
Oregon Mushroom Stories
Cyme & Cystidium
Small Things Considered
Fungi, a tumblr blog
Mid Missouri Morels and Mushrooms
きのこ キノコ 茸 木の子
Mycoblog
Notes of A MycoTaxonomic Vagrant
Advance of the fungi
truffle hunting and else
Ha bolond, ne szedd le!
amateurmycology.com
Mycota on tumblr
The Mold Blog
Cordyceps sinensis blog
The MycoKey Mycelium blog
The Dark Side of the Shroom
Medicinal Mushrooms
The Mushroom Diary
boletales.com
mykoweb’s blog
Riihivilla, Dyeing with natural dyes
Mag’ de la truffe
Morels Blog
Microbial Art
The Alabamycologist
GrUpPo MiCoLoGiCo LuCcHeSe B. PuCcInElLi
fungi in science
gomba után
let’s deliquesce
MycorWeb Fungal Genomics
Mushrooms Canada Blog
Mushroom Anna’s Adventures
Female & Fungi
Forays Blog
All things Cordyceps
Weird and Wonderful Wild Mushrooms

About

Most people don't pay much attention to fungi, which include things like mushrooms, molds, yeasts, and mildews. Here at Cornell we think they're pretty fascinating. In fact, even the most disgusting foot diseases and moldy strawberries are dear to our hearts. We'd like to talk to you about fungi, so that like us, you too can tell gross stories at the dinner table. Afterwards, maybe you'll notice some things you would have overlooked before, and we think this could be good for the planet.

Kathie T. Hodge, Editor

Beneath Notice, our book of borescopic mycology.

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